All Dental MCQs for MBBS Students 2024-25

All Dental MCQs for MBBS Students 2024-25

All Dental MCQs for MBBS Students : Here for MBBS Students Dental Multiple Choice Questions with answer . You Can Learn for your Future Examination. 

1st Test

WHO caries intensity levels are determined for age groups

  1. 12 and 15 years old
  2. 15 and 18 years old
  3. 12 years and 35-44 years
  4. 6 and 12 years old
  5. 35-44 years and 65 years and older

The main role in the development of infectious periodontitis belongs to

  1. Microorganisms, mainly streptococci
  2. Strong chemicals and medicinal substances
  3. Injury-blow, bruise

The percentage of people with signs of caries to the total number of those examined is called

  1. quality of dental care for the population
  2. level of dental care for the population
  3. intensity of dental disease
  4. prevalence of dental disease
  5. dental morbidity of the population

The intensity of the patient’s dental caries is expressed

  1. the ratio of the sum of carious, filled and removed teeth due to complications of caries to the age of the individual
  2. the sum of carious, filled and removed teeth due to complications of caries in an individual
  3. the sum of carious and filled teeth in an individual
  4. average indicator of the sum of carious, filled and removed teeth due to complications of caries in a group of individuals
  5. the ratio of the sum of carious, filled and removed teeth due to complications of caries to the total number of teeth in an individual

The percentage of people with caries to the total number of people examined is called

  1. prevalence of dental disease
  2. need for rehabilitation
  3. quality of dental care for the population
  4. intensity of dental disease
  5. dental morbidity of the population

The intensity of caries during the period of tooth change is assessed using the index

  1. KPIJ(z) and kp(z)
  2. kpu(z)
  3. KPCJ(z)
  4. IGR-U
  5. RMA

Are serous pulpitis distinguished in the classification of pulpitis according to ICD-IO?

  1. allocate
  2. do not allocate

The intensity of dental caries in a 3-year-old child is assessed using the index

  1. kpu(z)
  2. IGR-U
  3. KPU(z) and kp(z)
  4. KPU(z)
  5. RMA

To determine the intensity of dental caries in a patient, an index is used

  1. CPITN
  2. RNR
  3. RMA
  4. CPU
  5. IGR-U

When treating acute periodontitis, it is necessary to create an outflow of exudate through

  1. holes in the lower jaw
  2. root canal
  3. tooth socket after its removal

For dental caries it is necessary

  1. preparation of a carious cavity, pulp removal, root canal treatment, filling of the root canal and carious cavity
  2. preparation of a carious cavity, its formation, replacement of the defect with a filling
  3. preparation of a carious cavity, removal of necrotic tissue from the tooth root canal, treatment of the canal, filling of the canal and carious cavity

The etiological factor of purulent inflammatory diseases of the maxillofacial area is most often

  1. source of odontogenic infection (tooth)
  2. chronic tonsillitis
  3. infected wound
  4. post-injection complications

X-ray signs of periodontitis are determined

  1. in the acute stage
  2. in the chronic stage
  3. in the stage of exacerbation of chronic periodontitis correct option only

Complications of periodontitis include

  1. radicular cysts
  2. odontogenic maxillary sinusitis
  3. chronic odontogenic sepsis
  4. migrating odontogenic granuloma
  5. purulent-inflammatory complications (periostitis, abscess, phlegmon, osteomyelitis)

The prevalence of caries among adults is

  1. 70-80%
  2. 50-60%
  3. 95-97%
  4. 30-35%

Acute diffuse pulpitis must be differentiated from

  1. deep caries
  2. trigeminal neuralgia
  3. acute sinusitis
  4. acute focal pulpitis
  5. acute apical periodontitis

Percussion for dental caries

  1. painless
  2. painful

Acute focal pulpitis must be differentiated from

  1. apical periodontitis
  2. trigeminal neuralgia
  3. deep caries
  4. acute diffuse pulpitis

The WHO epidemiological dental survey methodology involves examining children aged (years)

  1. 12, 15, 18
  2. 9, 12, 15
  3. 6, 12, 15
  4. 6, 9, 12
  5. 3, 6, 9

KPU(z) is an index

  1. surface caries intensity
  2. determining the condition of periodontal tissues
  3. caries intensity of permanent teeth
  4. oral hygiene
  5. Intensity of caries of temporary teeth

The prevalence of dental caries is expressed in

  1. constants
  2. coefficients
  3. percent
  4. relative units
  5. absolute units

Name the stages of uncomplicated dental caries

  1. cement caries
  2. enamel acaries
  3. pulpitis
  4. periodontitis
  5. dentin caries

Acute diffuse pulpitis must be differentiated from

  1. deep caries
  2. trigeminal neuralgia
  3. acute sinusitis
  4. acute focal pulpitis
  5. acute apical periodontitis

Painful symptom of caries

  1. may occur spontaneously, does not stop after the stimulus is removed
  2. occurs under the influence of an irritant; after the action of the irritant is removed, it ceases

 For pulpitis it is necessary

  1. preparation of a carious cavity, removal of pulp, treatment of the root canal and carious cavity, filling of the canal and carious cavity
  2. preparation of a carious cavity, its formation, replacement of the defect with a filling

Treatment of dentin caries involves the use

  1. cavity preparation, removal of softened and pigmented dentin, cavity formation, filling
  2. Remineralizing therapy

2nd Test

 

First aid for pulpitis consists of

  1. removing food residues from the carious cavity
  2. rinsing with soda solution
  3. removing food residues, applying a tampon with painkillers
  4. conducting infiltration anaesthesia

Acute pulpitis may be (select several correct answers)

  1. focal
  2. fibrous
  3. hypertrophic
  4. gangrenous
  5. diffuse

At the purulent stage of acute periodontitis in the oral cavity are seen

  1. hyperemia, swelling of the gums in the area of the affected tooth
  2. no changes
  3. pale gums
  4. cyanotic gums

The forms of caries are treated in several visitings

  1. medium caries
  2. deep caries
  3. superficial caries
  4. in the stage of spot

Classification of dental caries by the depth of the lesion

  1. enamel, dentin, cement
  2. fissure, neck, circular
  3. in the spot stage, superficial, medium, deep
  4. acute, chronic

Chronic pulpitis may be (select several correct answers)

  1. focal
  2. fibrous
  3. gangrenous
  4. diffuse
  5. hypertrophic

First aid for pulpitis consists of

  1. removing food residues, applying a tampon with painkillers
  2. conducting infiltration anesthesia
  3. removal of food residues from the carious cavity
  4. rinsing with soda solution

For acute pulpitis pain is characterized by

  1. short-term from irritants
  2. paroxysmal, spontaneous, nocturnal
  3. long-term constants
  4. constant aching

The tooth brush removes from the tooth surface

  1. supragingival tartar
  2. pellicle
  3. smokers RAID
  4. soft plaque

To necrotize the pulp as a stage of treatment of pulpitis dentist can use

  1. iodine
  2. arsenic paste
  3. camporota
  4. camphor

The presence of a fistula characterized exacerbation of chronic

  1. granulomatous periodontitis
  2. fibrous periodontitis
  3. gangrenous pulpitis
  4. granulating periodontitis

If it is impossible to create an outflow of exudate from the periodontium through the root canal in the case of acute purulent periodontitis doctor should

  1. prescribe massive doses of antibiotics
  2. remove the tooth
  3. do periosteotomy
  4. do physiotherapy

The main cause of periodontitis is

  1. bad habits
  2. infection
  3. allergic reaction
  4. sudden impact

The outflow of exudate in acute or exacerbation of chronic periodontitis is most favorable through

  1. the system Haversian channels spread under the periosteum
  2. root canal
  3. periodontal pocket
  4. the fistula

First aid for dental caries

  1. removing food residues and a tampon with an anesthetic
  2. removing food residues and rinsing
  3. dental preparation and filling
  4. prescription of analgesics

If it is impossible to create an outflow of exudate from the periodontium through the root canal in the case of acute purulent periodontitis doctor should

  1. do periosteotomy
  2. do physiotherapy
  3. remove the tooth
  4. prescribe massive doses of antibiotics

The system of active dental care for the population aimed at identifying, treating and preventing of complications is called as

  1. oral cavity sanation
  2. medical examination
  3. prevention

The presence of a feeling of “grown tooth” is typical for

  1. chronic periodontitis
  2. acute pulpitis
  3. acute periodontitis
  4. gum disease
  5. chronic pulpitis

In which stage of caries, irritants (chemical, thermal, and mechanical) cause short-term pain

  1. in the spot stage
  2. superficial
  3. medium
  4. deep

 Classification of dental caries by the depth of the lesion

  1. acute, chronic
  2. enamel, dentin, cement
  3. fissure, neck, circular
  4. in the spot stage, superficial, medium, deep

 The cause of dental caries is

  1. temperature damage of enamel
  2. enamel demineralization
  3. radiation damage of enamel
  4. mechanical damage of enamel

The main cause of periodontitis is

  1. allergic reaction
  2. infection coming from an inflamed pulp
  3. sudden impact
  4. bad habits

The cause of dental caries is

  1. enamel demineralization
  2. mechanical damage of enamel
  3. radiation damage of enamel
  4. temperature damage of enamel

The accumulation of microorganisms, polysaccharides, proteins and lipids fixed on the enamel surface is

  1. the cuticle of the tooth
  2. tooth pellicle
  3. microbial plaque
  4. solid dental deposits
  5. food plaque

Spread of dental caries is expressed

  1. in relative units
  2. in absolute units
  3. as a percentage

 For acute pulpitis pain is characterized by

  1. short-term from irritants
  2. constant aching
  3. long-term constants
  4. paroxysmal, spontaneous, nocturnal

 Which irritants cause short term pain in dental caries

  1. all named irritants
  2. temperature
  3. chemical
  4. mechanical

Demineralization of enamel occurs as a result of

  1. actions of mineral acids
  2. actions of cold and hot food
  3. chronic trauma to the tooth
  4. actions of alkalis
  5. actions of organic acids

 If it is impossible to create an outflow of exudate from the periodontium through the root canal in the case of acute purulent periodontitis doctor should

  1. do periosteotomy
  2. do physiotherapy
  3. remove the tooth
  4. prescribe massive doses of antibiotics

The most common way of tooth pulp infection

  1. by lymphatic vessels (lymphogenic infection)
  2. by arterioles (hematogenic infection)
  3. through one of the apical foramens in the presence of a periodontal pocket
  4. through the dentine tubules from the carious cavity

 

3rd Test

 

The development of phlegmon in the maxillofacial region leads to impaired function

  1. breathing
  2. speech
  3. chewing
  4. swallowing
  5. violation of all specified functions is possible

 By the course osteomyelitis is classified as

  1. subacute, chronic
  2. acute, subacute, chronic
  3. limited, diffuse
  4. acute, chronic

The most typical clinical sign of periostitis is

  1. hyperemia and edema of the muco-gingival junction
  2. facial asymmetry
  3. mobility of all teeth
  4. bulging of sublingual rollers
  5. difficulty opening the mouth

A typical surgical approach in the treatment of periostitis consists of incision

  1. of mucosa and periosteum on the muco-gingival junction
  2. submental region in the midline
  3. in the submandibular region along the edge of the lower jaw
  4. the mucosa of the pterygomandibular fold-
  5. bordering the angle of the lower jaw

The main cause for the development of the abscess is

  1. fracture of the lower jaw
  2. bruising of the soft tissues of the face
  3. exacerbation of chronic periodontitis
  4. tumors of the alveolar process
  5. exacerbation of chronic sinusitis

The most common cause of phlegmons and abscesses of the maxillofacial region is

  1. pustular diseases of the skin of the face
  2. odontogenic foci of infection-
  3. damage of the skin of the maxillofacial area
  4. flu and other infectious diseases
  5. infection on the needle when performing local Anesthesia

The indication for tracheostomy due to respiratory disorders often occurs with phlegmon in

  1. buccal area
  2. submental region
  3. submandibular region
  4. parotid-chewing area
  5. mouth floor

Sequestrectomy for chronic osteomyelitis is indicated in the period

  1. formed of sequestration
  2. formation of sequestration
  3. after a course of physical therapy
  4. after a course of antibacterial therapy

The most frequent way of spreading inflammatory exudate from the periodontium to the periosteum

  1. by lymphatic vessels
  2. by the system Haversian and Volkmann canals
  3. by blood vessels
  4. along the nerve fibers

Causative tooth with acute odontogenic osteomyelitis should be

  1. replanted
  2. filled
  3. extracted
  4. to remove the pulp
  5. disclosed-

For abscesses and phlegmons, the main therapeutic measure is

  1. treatment with sulfonamides
  2. drainage of the suppurative focus
  3. the removal of a tooth
  4. treatment with antibiotics

In chronic stage of jaw osteomyelitis, sequesters are removed after (period of sequesters formation)

  1. 3-4 weeks
  2. 5-8 weeks
  3. 2-3 weeks
  4. I week

Treatment of chronic odontogenic osteomyelitis of the jaw with sequester formation

  1. antibacterial therapy
  2. in the rehabilitation of the oral cavity
  3. in periostotomy in the area of the causative tooth
  4. sequestrectomy
  5. antibiotic therapy, excision of the

The most typical clinical sign of jaw periostitis is

  1. bulging of sublingual rollers
  2. difficulty opening the mouth
  3. mobility of all teeth
  4. hyperemia and edema of the muco-gingival junction in the projection of the causative tooth
  5. facial asymmetry

The cause of acute odontogenic jaw osteomyelitis is

  1. exacerbation of chronic periodontitis
  2. fracture of the jaw
  3. exacerbation of chronic periodontitis against a background of decreased immunity
  4. acute lymphadenitis
  5. acute mumps

For the treatment of jaw osteomyelitis, drugs with an osteotropic effect used are

  1. lincomycin
  2. ampicillin, securin
  3. erythromycin, oxacillin
  4. penicillin, methyluracil
  5. kanamycin, Biseptol

The most common causes of jaw periostitis are (choose the right answers)

  1. acute periodontitis
  2. exacerbation of chronic sinusitis
  3. alveolitis
  4. bruising of the soft tissues of the face
  5. pericoronitis
  6. fracture of the lower jaw

Surgical treatment for acute odontogenic osteomyelitis of the jaw

  1. removal of the causative tooth, wide periostotomy of the jaw on one side, drainage
  2. removal of the causative tooth, wide periostotomy of the jaw on both sides, drainage
  3. a wide periostotomy of the jaw on both sides
  4. removing the causative tooth
  5. periostotomy in the area of the causal tooth, drainage

For abscesses and phlegmons, the main therapeutic measure is

  1. opening of a purulent focus
  2. treatment with antibiotics
  3. the removal of a tooth
  4. treatment with sulfonamides

The cause of acute odontogenic osteomyelitis of the jaws is

  1. acute lymphadenitis
  2. exacerbation of chronic periodontitis against the background of reduced reactivity of the body
  3. acute mumps
  4. fracture of the jaw
  5. exacerbation of chronic periodontitis

Surgical treatment for acute odontogenic jaw osteomyelitis

  1. periosteotomy in the area of the causative tooth, drainage
  2. removal of the causative tooth, wide periosteotomy of the jaw on one side, drainage
  3. removal of the causative tooth, wide two-sides periosteotomy of the jaw, drainage
  4. removing the causative tooth
  5. a wide periosteotomy of the jaw on both sides

The clinical picture of acute odontogenic osteomyelitis of the jaw is as follows

  1. the mobility of all teeth in the jaw
  2. in pain in the teeth, malaise, fistulas on the skin
  3. in sharp pulsating pain in the tooth, headache, positive symptom load
  4. chills, fever up to 40C, Vincent’s symptom, tooth mobility

 The clinical signs of acute odontogenic jaw osteomyelitis are

  1. toothache, malaise, fistulas on the skin
  2. chills, fever up to 40’C, Vincent’s symptom, tooth mobility
  3. sharp pulsating pain in the tooth, headache, positive symptom load
  4. mobility of all teeth on the jaw

Local signs of acute odontogenic osteomyelitis of the jaw are

  1. inflammatory infiltrate with clear borders, a negative symptom of the load
  2. Both-sides jaw infiltration without clear boundaries, Vincent’s symptom, tooth mobility
  3. inflammatory infiltration without clear boundaries, positive symptom of load
  4. mobility of all teeth on the jaw

The most common cause of phlegmons and abscesses of the maxillofacial region is

  1. pustular disease of the skin
  2. odontogenic foci of infection-
  3. flu and other infectious diseases
  4. introduction of infection on the needle when performing
  5. damage to the skin of the maxillofacial area

Abscess and phlegmons is an inflammation of

  1. muscles
  2. bones
  3. cellular tissue
  4. glands
  5. mucous membrane

The intensity of care for periostitis on the first day of the visit

  1. start acupuncture
  2. make a Novocain blockade
  3. prescribe physical therapy
  4. drainage of the suppurative focus-
  5. enter intramuscularly respiratory analeptics

The intensity of care for periostitis on the first day of the visit

  1. drainage of the suppurative focus
  2. prescribe physiotherapy treatment
  3. novocaine blockade
  4. acupuncture
  5. to enter intramuscular respiratory analeptics 

A typical clinical sign of submandibular phlegmon is

  1. swelling and hyperemia of the buccal areas
  2. infiltration and hyperemia of submandibular region tissues
  3. jaw contracture
  4. hyperemia of the skin in the lower lip area
  5. edema of the pterygomandibular fold

The most severe complication of phlegmon of the lower parts of the face is

  1. the mumps
  2. soft tissue hematoma
  3. mediastinitis
  4. facial nerve paresis
  5. sinus thrombosis of the brain

 

 

4th Test

 

Possible complication during maxillary molar removal surgery

  1. arthritis of the temporomandibular joint
  2. fracture of the tubercle of the upper jaw
  3. ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint
  4. trigeminal neuralgia
  5. mumps

Is it possible to tampon the socket with an iodoform tampon if a complication arises during Tooth extraction – opening of the bottom of the maxillary sinus

  1. it is forbidden
  2. only possible when post-extraction bleeding occurs
  3. possible only in case of purulent inflammation f the maxillary sinus
  4. possible in all cases

The first rocking movement when removing teeth of the upper jaw is made

  1. outwards, except for the removal of premolars and molars
  2. inside, except for removing the sixth tooth
  3. inside, except for the removal of premolars and molars
  4. outwards, except for removing the sixth tooth
  5. inside, except for molar removal
  6. outwards, except for molar removal

In the presence of inflammation in multi-rooted teeth, delayed epithelization is observed in

  1. 3 weeks
  2. 1 week
  3. no delay observed
  4. 2 weeks-

General somatic complications during Tooth extraction surgery include:

  1. alveolitis
  2. anuresis
  3. fainting-
  4. sinusitis
  5. osteomyelitis

When removing right lower molars and premolars, the doctor is

  1. arbitrary (any) position of the doctor
  2. to the left and in front of the patient
  3. to the right and in front of the patient
  4. to the right and behind the patient

At what stages of pregnancy may temporary contraindications to tooth extraction occur?

  1. at 3-4 months
  2. at 2-3 and 6-7 months
  3. at 1-2 and 8-9 months
  4. at 5-6 months

Forceps for removing the roots of the upper incisors

  1. bayonet-shaped
  2. beak-shaped root
  3. curved along the plane
  4. S-shaped with non-converging cheeks
  5. straight root-

Complications that occur immediately after tooth extraction surgery

  1. ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint
  2. arthritis of the temporomandibular joint
  3. mumps
  4. trigeminal neuralgia
  5. bleeding

In the presence of inflammation in single-rooted teeth, delayed epithelization is observed in

  1. 3 weeks
  2. no delay observed
  3. 1 week
  4. 2 weeks

The first rocking movement when removing teeth on the lower jaw is made

  1. outwards, except for removal of the second and third molars
  2. inside, except for the removal of the second and third molars
  3. inside, except for molar removal
  4. outwards, except for molar removal
  5. inside, except for the removal of premolars and molars
  6. outwards, except for the removal of premolars and molars

General somatic complications during Tooth extraction surgery include:

  1. sinusitis
  2. anuresis
  3. alveolitis
  4. collapse-
  5. osteomyelitis

In what forms can alveolitis occur?

  1. only in the form of osteomyelitis of the socket
  2. only in the form of a “dry socket”
  3. in the form of acute, chronic and recurrent
  4. in the form of a “dry socket” or osteomyelitis of the socket

If there are thorns on the cheeks of the tongs, then they are designed to remove

  1. lower incisors
  2. upper molars
  3. lower premolars
  4. lower molars
  5. upper premolars
  6. upper incisors

Epithelization of multi-rooted teeth occurs on what day after extraction

  1. 29-32 days
  2. 19-23 days
  3. 14-18 days
  4. 24-28 days

General somatic complications during tooth extraction surgery include:

  1. osteomyelitis
  2. sinusitis
  3. anaphylactic shock
  4. alveolitis
  5. anuresis

What method should be used to remove the root of a tooth pushed into the maxillary sinus?

  1. by maxillary sinusotomy without local anastomosis plastic surgery
  2. leave the root in the maxillary sinus until clinical symptoms of sinusitis appear
  3. by maxillary sinusotomy with local anastomosis plastic surgery
  4. Pichler’s method

Forceps for removing maxillary incisors

  1. straight radicular
  2. straight root-
  3. S-shaped with non-converging cheeks
  4. curved along the plane
  5. beak-shaped root

There are acute forms of alveolitis

  1. serous and hypertrophic
  2. purulent and purulent-necrotic
  3. serous and purulent-necrotic
  4. catarrhal and purulent

By what day, after tooth extraction, is the socket normally completely filled with granulation tissue?

  1. 3-4 days
  2. In 2 weeks
  3. in 3 weeks
  4. 7-8 days
  5. in 4 weeks

Remove with straight forceps

  1. maxillary incisors
  2. molars
  3. premolars
  4. mandibular incisors
  5. wisdom teeth

To treat alveolitis, is it possible to use turunda treated with antiseptic ointments?

  1. Can not use
  2. possible if hydrophilic ointments are used
  3. you can always
  4. possible, but in combination with drainage devices

How long after myocardial infarction can elective tooth extraction be performed?

  1. in 1-2 months
  2. in 1-2 years
  3. in weeks
  4. in 3-6 months
  5. in 1 week

Long-term local complications that arise after Tooth extraction surgery include:

  1. neuralgia
  2. anuresis
  3. myositis
  4. collapse
  5. Osteomyelitis

In case of perforation of the maxillary sinus that occurred during tooth extraction, complicated by acute sinusitis (without the presence of a tooth root in the maxillary sinus), it is indicated

  1. rinse the maxillary sinus once, maxillary sinus with fistula repair, in the postoperative period, rinse the sinus repeatedly (through the rhinostomy) with antiseptic solutions
  2. Carrying out a maxillary sinusotomy without local plastic surgery of the anastomosis
  3. planned maxillary sinusotomy with anastomosis plastic surgery
  4. washing the sinus with antiseptic solutions (to relieve inflammation), performing local plastic surgery of the anastomosis after eliminating the inflammatory phenomena
  5. urgent maxillary sinusotomy with anastomosis plastic surgery
  6. performing local plastic surgery of the anastomosis without maxillary sinusotomy

Forceps for removing the roots of the maxillary canines

  1. straight root
  2. curved along the plane
  3. S-shaped with spike
  4. beak-shaped root
  5. S-shaped with converging cheeks

On what day after tooth extraction do osteoid beams appear on the bottom and side walls of the socket?

  1. in 1 week
  2. in 2 weeks
  3. in 4 weeks
  4. in 3 weeks

At what time, after tooth extraction, des the socket begin to be filled with finely looped spongy bone tissue?

  1. by the end of the second month
  2. for 21 days
  3. by the beginning of the third month
  4. by the end of the first month
  5. on the 14th day
  6. by the middle of the second month

Can mental illness be a temporary contraindication to tooth extraction?

  1. no, they can’t
  2. maybe if they last more than 2 years
  3. can only during exacerbation

Possible complication during upper jaw tooth extraction surgery

  1. ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint
  2. perforation of the floor of the maxillary sinus
  3. trigeminal neuralgia
  4. arthritis of the temporomandibular joint
  5. mumps

Indications for planned tooth extraction

  1. chronic periodontitis
  2. acute purulent periodontitis
  3. catarrhal gingivitis
  4. worsened chronic periodontitis
  5. chronic pulpitis

When removing the lower front teeth, the doctor is

  1. arbitrary (any) position of the doctor
  2. to the right and behind the patient
  3. to the right and slightly in front of the patient
  4. to the left and behind the patient

Complications that arise during tooth extraction surgery

  1. alveolitis
  2. periostitis
  3. maxillary sinusitis
  4. fracture of the crown or root of the tooth being removed
  5. osteomyelitis

Long-term complications of a local nature after surgery to remove a tooth in the upper jaw include:

  1. myositis
  2. collapse
  3. neuralgia
  4. oroantral communication
  5. anuresis

Long-term local complications that arise after tooth extraction surgery include:

  1. collapse
  2. alveolitis
  3. anuresis
  4. myositis
  5. neuralgia

When removing left lower molars and premolars, the doctor is

  1. to the left and slightly in front of the patient
  2. to the left and behind the patient
  3. arbitrary (any) position of the doctor
  4. to the right and behind the patient

In case of complicated healing (alveolitis or osteomyelitis), how long does it take for the socket to be radiologically indistinguishable from the surrounding tissue?

  1. by 10-12 months
  2. by 6-8 months
  3. by 2-4 months
  4. by 8-10 months
  5. by 4-6 months

Long-term local complications that arise after tooth extraction surgery include:

  1. anuresis
  2. Alveoloneuritis
  3. neuralgia
  4. collapse
  5. myositis

The first rocking movement of the sixth upper tooth when removing it is made

  1. inside
  2. both outward and inward
  3. outward

Epithelization of single-rooted teeth occurs on what day after extraction?

  1. 10-12 day
  2. 16-18 day
  3. 24-30 day
  4. 12-16 days
  5. 20-22 day

The indication for tooth extraction is

  1. chronic granulomatous periodontitis
  2. acute periodontitis
  3. deep caries
  4. mumps
  5. acute pulpitis

In case of acute inflammatory process in the jaw, should a wound revision be carried out?

  1. yes, an audit should always be carried out
  2. should not be audited
  3. should be carried out, but only if thick pus is obtained from the wound
  4. after tooth extraction to remove remaining granuloma

The correct sequence of techniques for removing teeth with forceps

  1. closure, overlay, advancement of the cheeks, luxation and extraction of teeth
  2. advancement, imposition, closure of the cheeks, luxation and extraction of teeth
  3. application, advancement, closure of the cheeks, luxation and extraction of teeth
  4. overlay, closure, advancement of the cheeks, luxation and extraction of teeth

Are there absolute contraindications to tooth extraction?

  1. yes, there are absolute contraindications, but their number is limited
  2. there are many absolute contraindications
  3. no absolute contraindications

Forceps for removing maxillary premolars

  1. curved along the plane
  2. shaped with converging cheeks
  3. S-shaped without tenon
  4. straight root
  5. beak-shaped root

After tooth extraction it is shown

  1. intensive antiseptic rinses of the mouth no earlier than 2 hours after the operation
  2. drinking hot food or coffee within 2 hours after surgery
  3. UHF therapy in thermal dose
  4. antiseptic baths, intensive mouth rinses are contraindicated
  5. significant physical activity

How long after the tooth extraction operation, the pushed root (tooth) into the soft tissues should (can) be removed?

  1. no earlier than 2 weeks
  2. no earlier than 4 weeks
  3. no earlier than 3 weeks
  4. no earlier than 1 week

General somatic complications during tooth extraction surgery include:

  1. alveolitis
  2. osteomyelitis
  3. hypertensive crisis
  4. sinusitis
  5. anuresis

Forceps are used to remove maxillary canines.

  1. curved along the plane
  2. beak-shaped root
  3. straight root
  4. S-shaped with spike
  5. straight coronal

When removing the upper teeth, the doctor is

  1. to the left and in front of the patient
  2. arbitrary (any) position of the doctor
  3. to the right and in front of the patient
  4. in front and on the side corresponding to the tooth to be removed

What is the name of bleeding that occurs after surgery?

  1. Rhinogenic
  2. Symptomatic
  3. Idiopathic
  4. Iatrogenic

Possible complication during mandibular 3rd molar removal surgery

  1. osteomyelitis
  2. periostitis
  3. mandibular fracture
  4. alveolitis
  5. sinusitis

 

5th Test

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6th Test  (Periostitis)

The typical surgical approach for periostitis consists of an incision

  1. mucous membrane along the pterygomaxillary fold
  2. in the submental area along the midline
  3. mucous membrane and periosteum along the transitional fold
  4. in the submandibular region along the edge of the lower jaw
  5. bordering the angle of the lower jaw

When were drainages first used to treat purulent wounds?

  1. during the time of Galen (130-210 AD)
  2. in the middle of the 20th century
  3. at the beginning of the 20th century
  4. during the time of Pirogov N.I. +

In case of periostitis, you should

  1. remove the filling
  2. remove the causative tooth
  3. fill a carious cavity
  4. seal the canal before opening the periosteum
  5. expand the tooth-gingival pocket

The cause of the development of periostitis is

  1. pericoronitis +
  2. bruise of soft tissues of the face
  3. alveolar fibroma
  4. exacerbation of chronic maxillary sinusitis
  5. fracture of the condylar process of the mandible

What is the percentage of band neutrophils from the total number of leukocytes in the blood of healthy people

  1. 2-5% +
  2. 1-2%
  3. 15-20%
  4. 5-10%
  5. 10-15%

Temperature reaction in acute forms of periostitis and osteomyelitis of the jaws

  1. varies, i.e. with periostitis higher than with osteomyelitis
  2. is the same for both diseases +
  3. varies, i.e. with periostitis lower than with osteomyelitis

*The cause of the development of periostitis is

  1. bruise of soft tissues of the face
  2. fracture of the condylar process of the mandible
  3. alveolitis+
  4. alveolar fibroma
  5. exacerbation of chronic sinusitis

The clinical sign of periostitis is

  1. hyperemia and swelling of the transitional fold
  2. mobility of all teeth
  3. difficulty opening the mouth
  4. facial hematoma
  5. bulging of the hyoid ridges

The cause of the development of periostitis is

  1. bruise of soft tissues of the face
  2. alveolar fibroma
  3. exacerbation of chronic sinusitis
  4. acute periodontitis+
  5. fracture of the condylar process of the mandible

Periadenitis is

  1. purulent inflammation of the lymph node
  2. serous infiltration of tissues surrounding the inflammatory lymph node
  3. purulent inflammation of the tissues surrounding the inflammatory lymph node
  4. serous inflammation of the lymph node

If the cause of periostitis is a single-rooted tooth, it should be

  1. delete
  2. seal with resorcinol-formalin paste
  3. seal the canal before opening the periostitis
  4. open the tooth cavity before opening the periosteum

On the day of treatment for periostitis of the jaws, it is necessary

  1. prescribe physiotherapeutic treatment
  2. open a purulent focus
  3. make a novocaine blockade
  4. start acupuncture

What is the number of band neutrophils in the peripheral blood of healthy people?

  1. 2-0.4 09/1
  2. 1-0.2 xyuw/l
  3. 4-0.6 09/1 +
  4. 6-0.8

The cause of the development of periostitis is

  1. bruise of soft tissues of the face
  2. alveolar fibroma
  3. fracture of the condylar process of the mandible
  4. exacerbation of chronic maxillary sinusitis
  5. exacerbation of chronic periodontitis+

What is the percentage of segmented granulocytes (neutrophils) of the total number of leukocytes in the blood of healthy people

  1. 25-35%
  2. 55-58% +
  3. 36-48%
  4. 60-75%
  5. 80-90%

What is the number of segmented granulocytes (neutrophils) in the peripheral blood of healthy people

  1. 0-2.ox
  2. 0-14.3
  3. 5-10.5 xY9/l +
  4. 3-4.5 x 109/1

In case of periostitis, you should

  1. remove the filling
  2. fill a carious cavity
  3. remove the causative tooth
  4. seal the canal before opening the periosteum
  5. expand the tooth-gingival pocket

On the day of treatment for periostitis of the jaws, it is necessary

  1. open a purulent focus
  2. make a novocaine blockade
  3. prescribe physiotherapeutic treatment
  4. start acupuncture
  5. administer intramuscular respiratory analeptics

Periostitis of the jaws must be differentiated from

  1. acute sialodochitis
  2. chronic maxillary sinusitis
  3. trismus
  4. tooth fracture
  5. acute osteomyelitis+

What concentrations of dioxidine solution are used to treat purulent wounds?

  1. 1 -296 solutions
  2. 5% solution
  3. 2-3% solutions
  4. 5-1% solutions +
  5. 10% solution

Intraoral incisions (when opening ulcers) are made in children

  1. the same as in adults+
  2. below the transitional fold
  3. above the transitional fold

The treatment complex for acute periostitis includes

  1. X-ray therapy
  2. Physiotherapy +
  3. chemotherapy
  4. cryotherapy
  5. electrocoagulation

If the cause of periostitis is a single-rooted tooth, it should be filled

  1. a week later
  2. after inflammation subsides +
  3. if there is drainage
  4. on the third day after drainage removal
  5. immediately after drainage removal

The reason for the development of periostitis is

  1. fracture of the articular process of the lower jaw
  2. exacerbation of chronic sinusitis
  3. bruise of soft tissues of the face
  4. alveolar fibroma
  5. pericoronitis+

The treatment complex for acute periostitis includes

  1. manual
  2. antibacterial +
  3. hypotensive
  4. sedative
  5. radial

The typical surgical approach for periostitis consists of an incision

  1. mucous membrane along the pterygomaxillary fold
  2. in the submental area along the midline
  3. mucous membrane and periosteum along the transitional fold
  4. in the submandibular region along the edge of the lower jaw
  5. bordering the angle of the lower jaw

The typical surgical approach for the treatment of periostitis consists of an incision

  1. mucous membrane along the pterygomaxillary fold
  2. mucosa and periosteum along the transitional fold
  3. in the chin area along the midline
  4. in the submandibular region along the edge of the lower jaw
  5. bordering the angle of the lower jaw

Periostitis of the jaws must be differentiated from

  1. chronic maxillary sinusitis
  2. acute sialodochitis
  3. trismus
  4. -exacerbation of chronic periodontitis
  5. tooth fracture

A typical clinical sign of periostitis is

  1. bulging of the hyoid ridges
  2. facial asymmetry
  3. hyperemia and swelling of the transitional fold
  4. mobility of all teeth

Is there a relationship between the occurrence and characteristics of the clinical course of acute odontogenic inflammatory diseases

depending on the microbial sensitization of the patient?

  1. no, not available
  2. yes, available +
  3. Yes, but in rare cases

With periostitis, the purulent process is localized under

  1. Periosteum +
  2. muscle
  3. skin
  4. outer cortical plate of the jaw
  5. mucous membrane of the alveolar process

The treatment complex for acute periostitis includes

  1. hypotensive
  2. sedative
  3. desensitizing+
  4. manual
  5. radial

In acute purulent periostitis of the jaw, an x-ray reveals

  1. bulbous bedding
  2. sequester’s shadow
  3. chronic periodontitis of the causative tooth
  4. foci of bone tissue destruction
  5. focus of osteosclerosis +

In case of periostitis, you should

  1. fill a carious cavity
  2. open the tooth cavity +
  3. seal the canal before opening the periosteum
  4. remove the filling
  5. expand the tooth-gingival pocket

What concentrations of chlorhexidine are used to treat purulent wounds?

  1. 1 -2% solutions 
  2. 5% solution
  3. 5-1% solutions
  4. 1 0% solution
  5. 2-0.5% solutions

 

7th Test (Osteomyelitis of the jaw bones)

 

 

Are the clinical symptoms of acute (exacerbated chronic) periodontitis significantly different from those of acute odontogenic

  1. No
  2. osteomyelitis in the early stage of inflammation
  3. Yes

Classification of clinical and radiological forms of osteomyelitis

  1. Solovyov and I. Khudoyarov (1979)
  2. M. Alexandrova (1954)
  3. I. Semenchenko (1968)

How can we explain the almost complete absence of sequestration of tooth germs in children with odontogenic osteomyelitis?

  1. early surgical intervention both in the acute stage of the disease and during exacerbations
  2. early use of antibiotics

Primary chronic osteomyelitis occurs

  1. with a temperature reaction, with the formation of fistulas and normal purulent discharge. with extensive destruction of bone tissue
  2. without temperature reaction, Without fistula formation, with slight destruction of bone tissue

When are the first bone changes of odontogenic osteomyelitis detected using radiography?

  1. 2-5 days after the onset of the disease
  2. no earlier than a month after the onset of the disease
  3. for 10-14 days; after the onset of the disease
  4. 6-10 days after the onset of the disease

Clinical symptoms in acute odontogenic osteomyelitis are characterized by the clinic

  1. symptoms of all odontogenic inflammatory diseases of the jaws
  2. acute periostitis
  3. acute periodontitis

With osteomyelitis of the upper jaw in children, which part of the maxillary bone is predominantly affected?

  1. only medial
  2. lateral and medial
  3. only lateral

Osteomyelitis in children, as opposed to adults

  1. liquidated more slowly
  2. liquidated faster-

Osteomyelitis of the lower jaw in children, which localization occurs most easily

  1. bodies of the lower jaw, the cause of the disease is premolars
  2. bodies of the lower jaw, the cause of the disease is molars
  3. alveolar process
  4. mandibular angle

The general condition of patients with acute odontogenic osteomyelitis is often characterized by severity

  1. easy
  2. average
  3. severe
  4. moderate or severe-

What is the initial manifestation of the involvement of the lower orbital margin in the pathological process in osteomyelitis of the upper

jaw?

  1. bone sequestration
  2. fistulas in the area of the infraorbital margin
  3. abscesses at the inner and outer corner of the eye

Sequestral capsule for osteomyelitis of the jaws in the elderly

  1. less pronounced than in young people
  2. the same as for young people
  3. more pronounced than in young people

At what age does odontogenic osteomyelitis most otten develop ?

  1. at 40-60 years old-
  2. in adolescence
  3. at 16-20 years old
  4. in old age
  5. in childhood
  6. in early childhood
  7. at 20-40 years old

The spread of the osteomyelitic process to the body of the jaw is

  1. focal osteomyelitis
  2. diffuse (diffuse) osteomyelitis
  3. limited osteomyelitis

In outpatients, osteomyelitis of which jaw is more common?

  1. bottom
  2. top

Rare complications of jaw osteomyelitis in children

  1. sinusitis and ethmoiditis
  2. thrombophlebitis of facial veins
  3. dacryocystitis, meningitis
  4. abscesses and phlegmons
  5. sepsis
  6. inflammation of regional nodes

Osteomyelitis in older people, unlike young people, occurs

  1. less acute. pain reaction is not pronounced, slight infiltration, sequestration is rarely extensive-
  2. no different from that of young people
  3. more acute with severe pain reaction and tissue infiltration. extensive sequestration

Suppuration from the nose with osteomyelitis of the upper jaw in children indicates the predominant spread of inflammation to which part of the bone

  1. medial and maxillary sinus
  2. lateral
  3. posterior and ethmoid sinus
  4. anterior and angular vein of the face

How often do abscesses and phlegmons of the infratemporal and pterygopalatine fossae, as well as the temporal region occur with osteomyelitic lesions of the maxillary bone in young children?

  1. rarely
  2. often
  3. Often

The fulminant course of osteomyelitis is observed less frequently

  1. in older people
  2. in adults
  3. in children

Characteristic pathomorphological signs of odontogenic osteomyelitis

  1. proliferation of fibrous tissue from the site of inflammation
  2. foci of purulent infiltration of the bone marrow, vascular thrombosis, purulent fusion of blood clots, areas of hemorrhage foci of osteonecrosis
  3. presence of bone ossification with symptoms of hyperostosis

What usually appears in cases where odontogenic osteomyelitis in children begins with pus discharge from the nose

  1. fistulas in the area of the infraorbital margin
  2. osteomyelitis of the nasal bones
  3. brain abscesses
  4. phenomena of frontal sinusitis and ethmoiditis
  5. abscesses and phlegmons of the pterygopalatine fossa

Acute odontogenic osteomyelitis of the jaws is characterized by

  1. limited mouth opening, presence of pus when pressing on the gums
  2. subfebrile body temperature, general condition is not disturbed
  3. high body temperature, the patient’s general condition is serious, mobility of the causative and adjacent teeth, facial asymmetry
  4. complaints of intense pain in the jaw, pain occurs in paroxysms
  5. complaints of periodic aching pain in the tooth

Sequestration of the upper jaw in osteomyelitis in children differs from that in the lower jaw

  1. not extensive, comes later
  2. not extensive, comes earlier
  3. extensive, comes later
  4. extensive, comes earlier

According to the prevalence of the process in the jaw, they are distinguished

  1. acute, subacute, chronic and aggravated
  2. lytic and sequestering form
  3. purulent destructive and hyperostotic
  4. limited, focal and diffuse
  5. mild, moderate and severe

What is not typical for osteomyelitis of the lower jaw in children over 3 years of age?

  1. may lead to partial edentia
  2. the child’s process is eliminated faster
  3. more rapid onset in children
  4. extensive sequestration
  5. is more often of odontogenic origin
  6. can lead to deformation of the lower jaw and malocclusion

X-ray signs of acute odontogenic osteomyelitis in the first days of its development

  1. signs of periodontitis
  2. areas of necrosis, sequestration, sequestral capsule
  3. foci of bone loss of various sizes

Are there significant clinical differences between acute odontogenic periostitis and acute odontogenic osteomyelitis in the early stage Of

inflammation?

  1. There are few significant differences (radiography and disease severity)
  2. no, there are no significant differences
  3. There are many significant differences (pain, mobility and percussion of teeth, swelling of the jaw and soft tissues, etc.)

How does odontogenic osteomyelitis of the upper jaw occur in childhood, in contrast to that in the lower jaw?

  1. the same
  2. heavier
  3. easier

Which osteomyelitis of the lower jaw in children is most severe, when localized in the area

  1. jaw body, the cause of the disease is premolars
  2. alveolar process
  3. jaw body. the cause of the disease is molars
  4. mandibular angle

Bone tissue at the site of osteomyelitic inflammation becomes nonviable

  1. 5-10 days from the onset of the disease
  2. 10-14 days from the onset of the disease
  3. 2-4 days from the onset of the disease
  4. 14-20 days from the onset of the disease

Acute osteomyelitis of the upper jaw in young children has a tendency to

  1. widespread damage to the bone and surrounding soft tissues
  2. limited bone damage
  3. both limited and widespread damage to the bone and surrounding soft tissues

In hospitalized patients, osteomyelitis of which jaw is more common?

  1. top
  2. bottom

What processes are observed in the jaw with chronic osteomyelitis

  1. regeneration
  2. destruction
  3. destruction and regeneration

What form of osteomyelitis is more common in the upper jaw in children than in the lower jaw?

  1. cortical osteomyelitis
  2. hyperostotic
  3. spilled
  4. limited
  5. nesting

Chronic odontogenic osteomyelitis is characterized by

  1. decrease in the number of leukocytes to the upper limit of normal, normalization of the number of band cells, decrease in ESR
  2. appearance of young neutrophilic leukocytes
  3. the appearance of protein in the urine
  4. anisocytosis

What treatment is carried out during the formation of sequestration?

  1. increasing immunity, dental prosthetics, sanitation of the oral cavity and nasopharynx
  2. measures are aimed at fighting infection, preserving microcirculation, reducing vascular permeability, sequestrectomy
  3. opening the source of inflammation, preventing the development of infection and the formation of necrosis along the periphery of the pathological focus, reducing vascular permeability, reducing intoxication, symptomatic treatment

How long does the chronic stage of odontogenic osteomyelitis of the mandible in the ramus last?

  1. 3-4 weeks
  2. 4-6 weeks, and sometimes several months and even years
  3. 1-2 weeks
  4. no more than 4-6 weeks

Which theory of the origin of osteomyelitis is most correct?

  1. all theories complement each other
  2. influence of adrenal hormones
  3. infectious-embolic theory
  4. allergic theory of Derizhanov
  5. theory of neurotrophic disorders

According to the nature of the clinical course, osteomyelitis is distinguished

  1. acute, subacute, chronic and aggravated
  2. lytic and sequestering form
  3. mild, moderate and severe
  4. limited, focal and diffuse

Osteomyelitis is

  1. infectious-allergic, purulent-necrotic process that develops in the bone under the influence of external or internal factors
  2. a disease characterized by the spread of the inflammatory process from the periodontium to the periosteum of the alveolar process and the body of the jaw
  3. an inflammatory process that affects periodontal tissue and spreads to the adjacent bone structures
  4. inflammatory process in the bone tissue of the jaw

What pathomorphological changes are observed in odontogenic osteomyelitis

  1. inflammation and destruction of periodontium
  2. purulent infiltration of the bone marrow, vascular thrombosis, purulent fusion of blood clots, areas of hemorrhage and osteonecrosis
  3. purulent-inflammatory process in the jaw and surrounding tissues
  4. inflammation and destruction of the periodontium, purulent-inflammatory process in the periosteum

How the lower orbital edge of the maxillary bone is affected in osteomyelitis of the upper jaw in children

  1. only partially
  2. only completely
  3. fully or partially

Which term is not synonymous with “osteomyelitis”

  1. arthritis-
  2. osteitis
  3. cellulitis of the bones
  4. panostitis
  5. haversite

Drug treatment in the acute phase of odontogenic osteomyelitis

  1. promotes abortion
  2. does not contribute to abortive course and acute osteomyelitis becomes chronic

Osteomyelitis of the lower jaw, in contrast to a similar lesion of the upper jaw, is characterized by

  1. milder course, less frequent and varied complications, minor sequestration
  2. more severe course, more frequent and varied complications, extensive sequestration
  3. similar course on both jaws

How common is osteomyelitis of the lower jaw in children before the eruption of baby teeth?

  1. Often
  2. Often
  3. rarely

The sequestrap capsule on the upper jaw, with osteomyelitis in children, differs from that on the lower jaw in that

  1. extensive
  2. same as on the bottom
  3. practically not formed

Does acute odontogenic osteomyelitis always end in sequestration, i.e. becomes chronic

  1. always ends in sequestration
  2. does not always end in sequestration
  3. may not end in sequestration only if pathogenetic treatment was carried out from the first days of the development of the disease (on days 1 – 2)

The first clinical sign of sequestral rejection in odontogenic osteomyelitis

  1. blood test data
  2. the appearance of fistulas on the alveolar process of the jaw
  3. protrusion of granulations from the fistula tract
  4. X-ray data
  5. tooth mobility

 

 

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